scripsi: (adult)
I just realised that I forget to do a fanfic rec last Sunday and there won’t be one today either, as I’m going to do some reccing on [livejournal.com profile] calufrax next week.

I watched Nicholas Nickleby from 1977 this weekend. I liked it, but I suspect that the main reason for that is because this is one of the few Dickens novels I haven’t read. I saw it on telly in my early teens with Roger Rees as Nicholas, so I only had a hazy idea of the plot. So it was fun to watch to see how the plot unfolded. I also really liked the friendship between Nicholas (Nigel Havers) and Smike (Peter Bourke). And I was delighted to see Pauline Moran, who is Miss Lemon in Poirot, as an actress. Clearly not a high budget series, though. Almost all scenes, even out of doors, was filmed in a studio and the costumes were quite dreary.

And talk about hammy acting! I know, I know, many of Dickens characters are caricatures, but it can be a bit tiresome when every single actor in a scene chews on the scenery. I didn’t mind Nicholas and his sister Kate (Kate Nicholls) to be very emotional because they are teenagers, and they were, really, not that hammy all things considered. Then we had a few actors who didn’t ham it up at all, most notably the evil uncle Ralph Nickleby (Derek Godfrey) and Sir Mulberry Hawk (Anthony Ainley), which made for an almost too great a contrast to all those over the top acting. I can well imagine that this is the role that led to Ainley playing the Master, because Sir Mulberry is as an evil man. Uncle Ralph isn’t nice either, he uses Kate as bait for a dinner with his business associates. Sir Mulberry flirts with her in an extremely coarse way, upsetting the very young and sheltered Kate to a point that she leaves the dinner party. He follows her, proceeds to be extremely blunt and telling her that a no from a woman means yes and then try to force her to kiss him. Being a Victorian novel, this is shorthand for attempted rape. She is saved by her uncle, but only,, as Sir Mulberry points out, because he wanted a richer man than Sir Mulberry to show an interest in her. Then he continues to harass her, eventually leading him and Nicholas to have a fight and eventually he kills one of his former friends in a duel. And all this in a rather understated soft voiced way that makes your skin crawl.

So well worth seeing just for Ainley’s character, even though I enjoyed it as a whole. But perhaps I wouldn’t have done that so much if I had seen other adaptions more recently
scripsi: (adult)
I have been watching The Pallisers from 1974, on and off the whole Spring and now I’m finally done. It’s 26 fifty minutes episodes, and I have watched them in bits and pieces. It’s all on Youtube in handy 12 minutes bits. The original six books were written by Anthony Trollop between 1864-79 and is a bit of a soap opera. I can imagine it draw on the success of Upstairs, Downstairs. It has a huge cast and several sub-plots, but the main plot is the the marriage between Plantagenet Palliser and Lady Glencora. They are more or less forced to marry, both having other interests, but ultimately they have a very happy marriage.

Anthony Ainley doesn’t show up until episode 12 in the sub-plot concerning Lady Eustace.Read more... )
scripsi: (adult)
I continue watching old movies/tv series just because one particular actor, in this case Anthony Ainley. And The Blood on Satan’s Claw.

Oh, this was a bad one. The Shroud of the Mummy at least followed a narrative logic; Be warned against entering the mummy’s grave. Enter the mummy’s grave. Be killed off by the mummy. The Blood on Satan’s Claw’s plot was rather muddled, but this is what I think happens: A farmer finds a head in the ground, looking rather icky and with patches of fur. The head disappears, but young people starts to get affected by mysterious attacks and/or gets bespelled and starts to meet up for chanting and sex. They also get patches of fur growing. Then they are sacrificed and I think the fur was harvested and when enough had been collected, Satan would rise in corporeal form. It was all a bit patchy and the narrative all over, so it was difficult to follow. In the end the almost complete Satan was dispatched anyway, in a sequence with really bad special effects.

Read more... )
scripsi: (Default)
When I was about twelve, Swedish television aired a number of old horror movies during a summer. I was allowed to watch Dracula, Frankenstein, Frankenstein’s Bride, The Werewolf, The Mummy and The Monster From the Black Lagoon with my parent’s, but they vetoed The Portrait of Dorian Grey. Very wise of them, because I snuck out of bed and watched it on the sly and was deeply traumatized by the ending. And I couldn’t tell them, because they had told me to go to bed. But the lasting expression was an obsession with vampires and a deep love for old horror movies. I don’t care about modern horrors at all, what I want is those hammy movies that was made in the 1930’s-60’s.

The Mummy’s Shroud, a Hammer Horror movie from 1967 fits the bill perfectly, but I hadn’t actually seen it before, I hunted it out when because Roger Delgado is in it. It’s set in 1920 (lucky they tell us as everyone ins dressed in 60’s clothing) when an expedition find the tomb of a child pharaoh, buried in the desert by his faithful servant. They bring him back to Cairo, displaying him alongside the mummy of that very servant. The tomb also has a very living guardian who, with the help of the shroud in the title, resurrects the servant who then kills off all the members of the expedition apart from the hero and heroine.

Read more... )
scripsi: (Default)
When I was about twelve, Swedish television aired a number of old horror movies during a summer. I was allowed to watch Dracula, Frankenstein, Frankenstein’s Bride, The Werewolf, The Mummy and The Monster From the Black Lagoon with my parent’s, but they vetoed The Portrait of Dorian Grey. Very wise of them, because I snuck out of bed and watched it on the sly and was deeply traumatized by the ending. And I couldn’t tell them, because they had told me to go to bed. But the lasting expression was an obsession with vampires and a deep love for old horror movies. I don’t care about modern horrors at all, what I want is those hammy movies that was made in the 1930’s-60’s.

The Mummy’s Shroud, a Hammer Horror movie from 1967 fits the bill perfectly, but I hadn’t actually seen it before, I hunted it out when because Roger Delgado is in it. It’s set in 1920 (lucky they tell us as everyone ins dressed in 60’s clothing) when an expedition find the tomb of a child pharaoh, buried in the desert by his faithful servant. They bring him back to Cairo, displaying him alongside the mummy of that very servant. The tomb also has a very living guardian who, with the help of the shroud in the title, resurrects the servant who then kills off all the members of the expedition apart from the hero and heroine.

Read more... )

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