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I’m going to continue with the picture book-part of my 100 books list. It feels safe and comforting and exactly what I need right now. This book was originally my Mum’s, and both she and I have loved it so much, the book is nowadays a couple of loose leafs. I had no idea it was translated from English until I wrote this post. Written by Marguerite Brown and illustrated by Alice and Martin Provensen. It was part of the Golden Books series, and published in 1949.

The story is simple, two kittens, Hush and brush (Tuss and Puss for me) want to have the colour green, but has no idea how. They randomly mix colours, getting all sorts of them, but no green, until they accidently mix blue and yellow. It’s actually a very pedagogical book about colour mixing, and most importantly; the sweetest illustrations.

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I’m going to continue with the picture book-part of my 100 books list. It feels safe and comforting and exactly what I need right now. This book was originally my Mum’s, and both she and I have loved it so much, the book is nowadays a couple of loose leafs. I had no idea it was translated from English until I wrote this post. Written by Marguerite Brown and illustrated by Alice and Martin Provensen. It was part of the Golden Books series, and published in 1949.

The story is simple, two kittens, Hush and brush (Tuss and Puss for me) want to have the colour green, but has no idea how. They randomly mix colours, getting all sorts of them, but no green, until they accidently mix blue and yellow. It’s actually a very pedagogical book about colour mixing, and most importantly; the sweetest illustrations.

Read more... )
scripsi: (adult)
I feel a need to revisit my childhood favourites in my 100 books right now. Perhaps not so strange, all things considered.

When I was about twenty-five I was browsing a bookstore, coming across a great big stack of picture books. As soon as i saw them, I was flooded with memories of reading just those books as a small child. I had loved them, but somehow they got lost, and they were forgotten. Reading them brought back all the joy I always felt as a child when I looked in those books. If I need an instant gush of happiness, I go and pick one of them up.



As you see this is really two books, but I always see them as a whole. What Do You Do, Dear and What Do You say, Dear were written by Sesyle Joslin and illustrated by Maurice Sendak in the early 60’s. In truth I love basically everything Sendak has ever illustrated, especially Where the Wild Things Are, but these two book on manners and proper conduct, will always be my favourite.

The concept is simple, someone is presented with a problem, and the authorial voice ask what do do, or say, and on the next page, we’ll get the answer. But the problem is always absurd, often fantastical, and the protagonists, a boy and a girl, are clearly dressed up, and even for a small child it’s obvious that even a potentially dangerous situation, are just make believe.

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I feel a need to revisit my childhood favourites in my 100 books right now. Perhaps not so strange, all things considered.

When I was about twenty-five I was browsing a bookstore, coming across a great big stack of picture books. As soon as i saw them, I was flooded with memories of reading just those books as a small child. I had loved them, but somehow they got lost, and they were forgotten. Reading them brought back all the joy I always felt as a child when I looked in those books. If I need an instant gush of happiness, I go and pick one of them up.



As you see this is really two books, but I always see them as a whole. What Do You Do, Dear and What Do You say, Dear were written by Sesyle Joslin and illustrated by Maurice Sendak in the early 60’s. In truth I love basically everything Sendak has ever illustrated, especially Where the Wild Things Are, but these two book on manners and proper conduct, will always be my favourite.

The concept is simple, someone is presented with a problem, and the authorial voice ask what do do, or say, and on the next page, we’ll get the answer. But the problem is always absurd, often fantastical, and the protagonists, a boy and a girl, are clearly dressed up, and even for a small child it’s obvious that even a potentially dangerous situation, are just make believe.

Read more... )
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My father is a very private man, not very much for big gestures of affections. But I’ve never doubted his love and care for me, and one of his ways to show it, is to gift you with books. All through my childhood he would randomly give me a book he thought I might like. Most of them became books I loved. When I was about thirteen, he gave me Collected Poems by Karin Boye.



Karin Boye was a Swedish author, born in 1900 and died 1941. She worked as a translator and she wrote several novels, only one which is still read, Kallocain (1940). It’s a dystopian SF novel about a future where people live in a totalitarian world state where Kallocain is a truth drug, used to suppress and root out any thought on rebellion. It was an inspired by a visit to germany and the uprising of the Nazists in the early 1930’s. She also met her lifelong partner there, Margot Hanel, who was Jewish. But Boye is also famous for her poems, publishing four collections during her life, and a fifth one came after her death. She killed herself in 1941 after visiting a friend, who Boye seems to have had an unsided crush on, who was dying in cancer. It’s likely the friend's illness may have contributed to her decision, but also WWII, which she was very pessimistic over. Margot killed herself a month later.

I think the most famous lines of her poems is these;

Yes, of course it hurts when buds are breaking.
Why else would the springtime falter?


For the teenage me, her poems were wonderful. The themes of growing, struggling and one-sided love suited my own feelings, and I used my paperback as a kind of diary. It’s filled with underlined lines, and notes explaining I felt exactly like that on a particular date. Poems are difficult to translate, but all Boye’s poems have rather good translations, and all are available here. And below is a few of my favourites.

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I haven’t finished anything, though I am reading a lot. But then I am reading four things as once, as I usually do. I’m on a fairy tale trip lately. And my sister’s latest IVF-treatment didn’t work, which makes us all sad. So I’ll talk about one of my comfort books today.

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Samlade Svenska kulter (“Collected Swedish Cults”) by Anders Fager. Fager writes books where he mixes Lovecraft’s mythology with Swedish myths and I think it works very well. Sadly he is only translated to French and Finnish so far, apart from an odd short story or two. Samlade Svenska kulter is a collection of short horror stories. They are a mixture between rather long novellas who work on their own, but they are bound together with brief stories called Fragments. And that is just what they are, short scenes that connect some stories or bring the spotlight on an aspect of one of the longer ones. And though the novellas are their own stories you realise as you read that they are connected to each and after reading the whole book you have been given a larger story.

Read more... )
scripsi: (adult)
Samlade Svenska kulter (“Collected Swedish Cults”) by Anders Fager. Fager writes books where he mixes Lovecraft’s mythology with Swedish myths and I think it works very well. Sadly he is only translated to French and Finnish so far, apart from an odd short story or two. Samlade Svenska kulter is a collection of short horror stories. They are a mixture between rather long novellas who work on their own, but they are bound together with brief stories called Fragments. And that is just what they are, short scenes that connect some stories or bring the spotlight on an aspect of one of the longer ones. And though the novellas are their own stories you realise as you read that they are connected to each and after reading the whole book you have been given a larger story.

Read more... )
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Not much actually as I’m in a sewing mood right now and sew more than I read.

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When I read The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova the first time it felt like a book written specifically for me. I love long, slow-moving books. I love historical mysteries. I love vampires. I love multiple time-lines. I love history. And though I can’t say that this particular book had an unusual impact on me, it is representative for a few interest that has followed me for a long time.

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When I read The Historian by Elizabeth Kostova the first time it felt like a book written specifically for me. I love long, slow-moving books. I love historical mysteries. I love vampires. I love multiple time-lines. I love history. And though I can’t say that this particular book had an unusual impact on me, it is representative for a few interest that has followed me for a long time.

Read more... )
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One of my projects this year is to re-read those books that somehow mattered a bit more than other books. Not just fun, or interesting, but bit more. And I will start with the first book I can remember that brought the magic of literature to me. This book was a picture book, Historien om någon (The Story About Someone) by Åke Löfgren and illustrated by Egon Möller-Nielsen, and I was three years old. It’s something of a classic in Sweden, first published in 1951.



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scripsi: (adult)
One of my projects this year is to re-read those books that somehow mattered a bit more than other books. Not just fun, or interesting, but bit more. And I will start with the first book I can remember that brought the magic of literature to me. This book was a picture book, Historien om någon (The Story About Someone) by Åke Löfgren and illustrated by Egon Möller-Nielsen, and I was three years old. It’s something of a classic in Sweden, first published in 1951.



Read more... )
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My first books to read this year is The Masked City by Genevieve Cogman, and then I had to re-read The Invisible Library which TMC is a sequel of. TIL was one of my most enjoyable find last year and it stood up well for a re-read.

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[personal profile] verdande_mi asked: Favourite Swedish children's book?

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[livejournal.com profile] verdande_mi asked: Favourite Swedish children's book?

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My sinuses are still acting up, which is why I have been pretty scarce- I get too headachy with staring into the computer screen. And I’ll probably continue to have a spotty attendance for a while as YY i looming up and I think I need to concentrate on writing fic now. Even if my main fic just need a little polish, I would like to get in a couple of treats too.

But thinking ahead; I’m thinking of doing a special kind of re-read next year. Not all time favourites, though a few of those will be included, but of books that somehow counted. That made me think or act a bit different or see things in another light. Books (or authors or book series) that had an impact. Most of those are books I read in my childhood and teens, which probably isn’t so peculiar. I think it would be interesting for me to re-read them and write a little of why they are so special to me. Hopefully some of you will find it interesting to read too. Or perhaps join in?
scripsi: (adult)
My sinuses are still acting up, which is why I have been pretty scarce- I get too headachy with staring into the computer screen. And I’ll probably continue to have a spotty attendance for a while as YY i looming up and I think I need to concentrate on writing fic now. Even if my main fic just need a little polish, I would like to get in a couple of treats too.

But thinking ahead; I’m thinking of doing a special kind of re-read next year. Not all time favourites, though a few of those will be included, but of books that somehow counted. That made me think or act a bit different or see things in another light. Books (or authors or book series) that had an impact. Most of those are books I read in my childhood and teens, which probably isn’t so peculiar. I think it would be interesting for me to re-read them and write a little of why they are so special to me. Hopefully some of you will find it interesting to read too. Or perhaps join in?

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